How to be safe from coronavirus?

Corona Virus

How to be safe from coronavirus? – The American Red Cross is closely monitoring the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and following the latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

We know this is a stressful time and people want to know what they can do right now to protect themselves and their families. That’s why the Red Cross is highlighting some everyday steps that people in the U.S. can take now. In addition, stay informed about what’s happening in your local community and always follow the directions of state and local authorities.

LIMIT THE SPREAD OF GERMS AND PREVENT INFECTION(How to be safe from coronavirus?)

The Red Cross recommends the following steps to help prevent the spread of germs during this situation:

  • Stay home if you can and avoid gatherings of more than ten people.
  • Practice social distancing by keeping a distance of about six feet from others if you must go out in public.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after being in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing; throw used tissues in the trash. If a tissue isn’t available, cough or sneeze into your elbow or sleeve, not your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, handles, desks, computers, phones, keyboards, sinks, toilets, faucets, and countertops.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them – use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • Wear a facemask if you are sick. You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.


According to the CDC, COVID-19 symptoms include fever, shortness of breath and a cough. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure. Call your doctor for medical advice if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop symptoms.

WHO IS AT A HIGHER RISK?

According to the CDC, early information shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this virus. This includes older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.

If you are at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 because of your age or a serious medical condition, it is extra important for you to take action to avoid getting sick.

Stay home as much as you can and avoid crowds as much as possible. Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.

  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.
  • Stock up on supplies.
    • Contact your healthcare provider to ask about obtaining extra necessary medications to have on hand in case there is an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community and you need to stay home for a prolonged period of time.
    • If you cannot get extra medications, consider using a mail-order option.
    • Be sure you have over-the-counter medicines and medical supplies (tissues, etc.) to treat fever and other symptoms. Most people will be able to recover from COVID-19 at home.
    • Have enough household items and groceries on hand so that you will be prepared to stay at home for a period of time

How to protect yourself from the coronavirus?

Nothing has changed about the way COVID-19 spreads, Dr. Moorcroft says, so the basics still apply. The coronavirus is spread through respiratory vapor, such as when someone sneezes or coughs into the air around you. It can also spread if someone who is infected sneezes or coughs into their hand, then touches a door handle, light switch and other “high-touch” surfaces.

Influenza viruses and common cold viruses are also spread this way. However, now that the virus is more widespread in the US, other preventative guidelines do apply, such as the now-well-known concept of social distancing. 

Wash your hands

Yes, this is still the no. 1 way to prevent coronavirus, Dr. Moorcroft says. “The things you should do to protect yourself from the coronavirus are things you should do every day,” he points out. “The no. 1 thing you can do to prevent any respiratory illness is to practice good personal hygiene.”

Washing your hands correctly — using soap and water and washing for at least 20 seconds — or using hand sanitizer when soap and water aren’t available, still stands as the best way to prevent the spread of infectious diseases, according to the CDC.   

Stay home

The CDC, the WHO, governments, and healthcare workers are all urging people to stay home if they can. Obviously, some people don’t have the luxury of working from home, and people still need to venture out to grocery stores and gas stations. But when you can stay home, do so to flatten the curve. 

If you do need to leave the house, follow some basic preventative measures.

Follow local public health guidelines

By mid-March 2020, many states, counties, and cities implemented their own protective measures to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. Many public and private schools are closed, and youth sports programs have been suspended just as college and professional sports have. Restaurants and bars are closed or have limited hours and capabilities, as do other nonessential businesses, such as clothing stores. 

If your state or local government has imposed guidelines, you should follow them to the best of your ability. 

Boost your immune system

On top of basic illness prevention, Moorcroft says the best (and only real) defense against disease is a strong immune system. Your body is better able to fight off illnesses when your immune system is really humming, he explains, and everyone should put in an effort to get theirs into tip-top shape. 

“This is a time to focus on all the healthy habits you may have been putting off,” Moorcroft says. “Start daily activities and food choices that support your health and turn them into habits that will lead to lifelong improvements in health. During this time, get adequate sleep and some fresh air and sunlight daily.” 

Also, stay hydrated, minimize overly processed foods and make sure to eat enough micronutrients when you can (try your best with what you can find at grocery stores right now).

Try to stay calm

In addition to your physical health, you should take care of your mental health. High-stress levels can take a toll on your immune system, which is the opposite of what you want in this situation. If you’re feeling overly anxious about COVID-19, follow these tips from a psychotherapist to keep your nerves calm.

Other tips

Moorcroft also reiterates the CDC’s advice for avoiding coronavirus (and other respiratory diseases): 

  • Sneeze and cough into tissues or the crook of your elbow. If you get mucus or spit on your skin, clean it off right away. Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, especially people exhibiting respiratory symptoms and fever.
  • Stay home when you’re sick.
  • Regularly and thoroughly clean surfaces, such as countertops and doorknobs, with a disinfectant. 

As for face masks, the CDC still maintains that only those who are sick should wear them to prevent the spread of the virus. If you are not sick, you don’t need to wear a face mask unless you’re caring for someone who is sick.

How can I protect myself while traveling?

You really shouldn’t be traveling anywhere at this point, according to the WHO, the CDC, the federal government and state governments. Avoiding travel — even travel within your own city — is the best way to stop the spread of coronavirus, Moorcroft reiterates. For travel guidelines, check with your local or state officials, and stay up-to-date with federal travel restrictions, CDC recommendations, and WHO recommendations.

Stay informed

As COVID-19 spreads across the US, Moorcroft encourages everyone to stay armed with the facts. Specifically, he recommends monitoring the CDC website and the WHO website, where both agencies post daily updates on the number of cases in the US and in the world, as well as continually updated guidelines on how to protect yourself and others. 

It’s easy to get swept up in the ever-increasing amount of information available online, as well as the fear factor and misinformation from social media, and your best bet is to get your information from the actual health organizations that are investigating the issue firsthand. 

“I hope that people will feel empowered by knowing the facts,” Moorcroft says, “and say, ‘I have access to the information, I know how to take care of my body and I can keep myself safe.'”

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